CACE was a vendor at the 2016 Great Insect Fair - an annual event sponsored by...

November 04, 2016

CACE was a vendor at the 2016 Great Insect Fair - an annual event sponsored by the Penn State Univ. Dept. of Entomology to educate the public about many aspects of insects and other bugs. It included exhibits of pollinators, edible bugs, pests, and just plain cool critters. CACE featured many of our insect ornaments hand-made by campesino artisans from the town of Jenaro Herrera on the Ucayali River in the Peruvian Amazon.




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